Tag Archives: new experiences

Finding My Place (part 2)

Back to back blog posts? Someone finally has a day off!

So after ending my saga with the “real” job, I decided that perhaps I should focus more on Business English. I was already teaching one group, so I thought I would expand on that. I was also teaching one middle school writing class, so I also let the director of that school know that I could take more hours if she had more classes, as long as they weren’t too young.

I taught kindergarten and elementary kids for most of my five years in Korea. I enjoyed the little guys, but I was definitely enjoying my adult class more. It was awesome to use all my experience in business to go along with my teaching experience, so that’s why I decided to focus more on that group.

As mentioned in my last post, things don’t always work out the way you think they will.

I am fairly confident that I could have built up work with nothing but adult business classes if I really wanted, or that I still could. But it turns out that I got really lucky with that middle school writing class.

First, how I found those first two classes.

The business group contacted me when I posted my details on a site called Vietnam Works. They had reached out to me before I had even left Korea, and they were the first class I ever taught here. They have been absolutely lovely, but sadly the class is coming to an end. The core group is going to be working on a huge project for the next couple of months, so they have to suspend their studies. They are hoping we can work together again, but as I really can’t afford to keep their time slot (which is a prime time slot) held for them, I don’t know if it will work out. Time will tell.

The writing class I found on Facebook, where most of the jobs are. There are loads of groups for finding teaching jobs in Vietnam. An overwhelming number. But it was definitely the most useful place to find work.

Someone had posted a “I’m a teacher, do you have work” post (as many do, myself included) on one of the groups and this director had replied to him saying she had a writing class. I sent an email to her and the rest fell into place.

Happily, she was (and is!) super happy with my teaching. Right from the beginning she was asking if I had more availability, but I warned her that the “real” job could start at any time and besides… if I was teaching full time in the public school I may have to even bail on the writing class I was already teaching. She was over the moon when I told her that I wasn’t going to be taking that job anymore.

Long story short, I now work more than 20 hours a week for her. I mostly teach writing to students in elementary through to high school. I also teach one gentleman English – a lot of general speaking and writing but occasionally it is business focused. He’s fairly low level, so it is a good mix for his class. I do teach a phonics class, but not for much longer. I’ll primarily be a writing teacher.

A writing teacher. How the hell did that happen? I’m a little concerned that I’m in over my head. I can put words to paper (or, more accurately, words to blog about once every few months) but how much ability do I really have to teach someone to write a kick-ass SAT or IB test essay?

I’m going to do my best to skill up for this. Teaching is as much a learning process as anything else. Having never sat a SAT (heh) or IB test, my first goal is simply to find out more about what it entails. From there, how to teach it.

Because I lack the experience to focus specifically on these requirements until I learn me some more, I’m going to do my best to help these guys a) skill up on basics so they don’t make so many “silly” mistakes in their writing and b) get interested in writing. I hope that I can find a way to inspire these sacks of potential into enjoying writing at least a little.

So it looks like, at least for now, I’ve found my place in Hanoi. From Jodi Teacher, kinder kid wrangler and elementary monster tamer to Ms. Jodi, writing teacher for older and more advanced students. Wish them luck!

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Finding work. Good work.

It’s hard to believe that I’ve already been in Hanoi for over a month now, whilst at the same time unbelievable that it has only been a month. It feels like it has been much longer than that, both in good ways and bad. It seems like it has been longer because it feels good here, man. Feels like this could be home. On the other hand, I think it feels like more time has gone by because we’ve been so busy trying to get settled and find decent work.

I’ve been asked a few times what finding work here is like. And I always answer the same way: Easy, bro. SO EASY. And it is. But I should really be telling people that whilst finding work might be easy, finding good work has been a little tougher.

First, a bit about me if you don’t already know, because my experience and shiz has a lot to do with the work-search situation, if you know what I mean. I am Canadian. Female. I am Caucasian. I have a BA in English Literature and Theatre. I have 5 years experience teaching in Korea. I have a cheesy 150 hour online TEFL course.

That’s me. And yes, all those details ~especially the colour of my skin~ matters. It matters here just like it did when I was in Korea. I’m not just a teacher here, I’m a walking advert for the school. And they all want a particular look, namely white skin preferred. I’d only be better off if I was slimmer, younger, blonder, prettier, and more blue-eyeder. Seriously.

Because of what I look like, my education, and my experience, I’m a highly sought-after commodity. However, it also means that I reserve the right to be a bit more picky about the places I choose to work.

If you don’t have the superficial “qualifications” that I do going on, you can still be alright as long as you have the BA, TEFL (preferably a CELTA), and are a native English speaker. Bonus points for experience. These are the goods you need in order to get a proper work permit and resident card from the government. And the major centers here that are doing thing above the board (Schools/Language Link, E-Connect, APAX, Apollo, ILA, others) will want you to have those papers so you can be legit.

There is a lot of work if you aren’t legit though. There are loads of people running “schools” out of their apartments that are much less picky about your paperwork and more than happy to pay you cash in hand after each lesson. Some of these places end up being pretty good. Some of them are nasty. I’ve experienced both.

While I wait for my REALLY REAL job to kick off in August, I’ve been picking up side work to keep the coffers full. I’ve had two good experiences, and one bad.

The first was good. I teach a group of adults for 2 hours three days a week. The pay is average for Hanoi, but the work is light and easy, and the class is fun. They are eager to learn and have a good level already, so we are mostly building confidence and working on making their written and spoken English more natural sounding and ready for international business. I really enjoy this class a lot.

The second is also very good. Even though it is in an apartment building, this owner has completely transformed the area into a great learning space. Proper desks and classrooms, whiteboards, photocopier, CCTV, the works. She has books ready and the space is clean and bright. I’m teaching one writing class for her, with another starting next week. I haven’t been paid yet, but as long as there is no problem with my pay (which I agreed to once a month), then I will continue to work with this place too. I also really enjoy the class of middle-school Korean kids I’m teaching for her.

Now. The third place. *shudder*

Looking back, there were warning signs. But I had been lucky so far, so I had ignored them. Woe to me, I ignored them. May you learn from my idiocy.

It was meant to be just a cover situation while her teacher was on holidays, but even over our initial text messages she kept repeating how she would love a teacher to work long term with. The two stories didn’t quite match, and it should have been a red flag. The current teacher was on holidays and leaving in the spring, so I chalked it up to that. Now I’m not so sure.

She sent me the address of where I would be teaching. It was just over the arbitrary boundary I had set that I was willing to commute to, but as it was just off a major roadway, Google Maps was telling me that it would take 30 minutes. This is my cut-off for how long I will commute, and coupled with it being for 3 hours of class at a time, I thought it would be okay. When I told the owner that I would be okay with 30 minutes, but that was my limit, she said she understood. Keep this in mind – she said she understood that 30 minutes was the furthest I was willing to travel.

The day before we were going to meet, she asked if we could meet at a coffee shop in the Old Quarter instead of at the school. Now, I thought she was either a) going to be in that area anyway and it would be easier for both of us or b) she just wanted to make it a quicker journey for me. Now, it should have also been a red flag… but I was thinking positively, not that she might be trying to hide something. So I agreed to meet her at the coffee shop.

::SIDE NOTE::

Here is a red flag for y’all that Dan has experienced: Unless it is literally covering one class, that day, pay on completion, do NOT agree to teach without meeting the people you are going to be teaching for. If they don’t care to meet you (aka “interview ya”) before you work for them, they aren’t serious enough about what they are doing.

::END SIDE NOTE::

So I met her. And she was very nice and spoke English well. Both good signs. She’d been in business about a year and had a good number of students. Also good signs. Which probably distracted me from the bad signs.

She couldn’t tell me what they had been doing up until the day we met. As in, we met on Monday and she has Sunday classes, yet couldn’t explain to me what they had just covered. And she said she was the TA. What? That doesn’t even make sense. They also had no textbooks, they did songs and stories from YouTube and played games. This should have also been a red flag, but I don’t know how Vietnam works yet so it may have been alright. It wasn’t.

In addition to her not being able to tell me where the students were at in terms of their overall studies, she couldn’t describe their level. Sure, she could rank against each other (sort of), but she couldn’t actually tell me what their levels were in terms of what they had learned or what they knew. She also had no lesson plans for what I was going to cover, nor did she have any from the past few months as her current teacher didn’t use them. Even though the teacher “prepared everything”, lesson plans were apparently not part of that preparation.

Now, again: Learn from my mistakes. Unless you are hella desperate, do NOT accept a cover position that doesn’t have lesson plans in place and materials prepared. It simply is not worth your time to do a load of planning and prepping for a couple of classes. I know this now. Never again.

At the end of our “interview”, she said that she would send me more information. She also kept pushing that she would like a long-term teacher, and I kept responding that I couldn’t promise anything past July 15. She was really keen to talk more about putting more of a program in place for her school, as she thought I could help her. Later, I found out why.

The information she sent me told me nothing. A lesson plan from eight months ago for one of the four classes. A list of “expressions”. A list of “vocabulary”… except it wasn’t. That list said things like “fruit” and “occupations”… but not which ones they had actually learned. I had no idea which they had done and which they needed to do. I didn’t know if they were learning to read these words or just speak them. Did they know how to answer in sentences?

I called the owner to clarify, and it basically told me that they had been doing whatever. The expressions and vocabulary didn’t match up. There was no plan. So I suggested I just review for the two weeks I would be there and I’d send her my plan. She was thrilled. I sent her my plan. She was overjoyed and said it would be perfect. Remember that – she loved the plan.

This is becoming a long-ass story. So let me cut it short. This was after the first two classes, taught on a Wednesday:

  1. The “school” was her living room with the furniture moved out of the way.
  2. Her mom was cooking dinner while we had class.
  3. There was a small whiteboard just leaning against the wall.
  4. There was her tv and computer.
  5. There was a handful of flashcards, mostly manky.
  6. There were no posters, no alphabet, nothing on the walls that made you think that was a place to learn.
  7. The students came in as they felt like it, making it difficult to know when to start.
  8. There were no desks or mats or anything – they just sat on the floor.
  9. There were no books. Not just textbooks, storybooks. Or rather, there were two storybooks. One of them had no words. The other had all the pages ripped out and there were some pages missing.
  10. Her toddler ran around the entire time I was trying to teach.
  11. My “TA” (the owner, remember) sat on her phone the entire time and was disconnected from the class entirely.
  12. Partway through the class the owner says, “you should have given them a break, let them have one now”. Maybe it would have been great to bring that up before I started, eh?
  13. The second class was only 2 girls (the others were absent) so she said “do whatever you want”. But she also said that I couldn’t teach them the way I did the first class because they would be bored. Even though she had previously said they were the same level. Wut?

If you don’t wanna click in and look at my captions… those are the pictures of the classroom. Between the two whiteboards was her food-smelly kitchen. This is literally all there was. No colors, no joy, no indication that there was a class about to happen.

That was the first night. I’m sure you are wondering why I went back. Well, we needed the money. And it was just two weeks. So I thought I could just suck it up and get through it. But then Friday happened.

  1. An hour or so before class is to start, she texts me to tell me to not be late. I was early to meet her. I was early to the Wednesday classes. So WTF? I text back to say “I’m actually leaving now.” Which I was… because I hate being late. But it is a 30 minute ride… right? So I was going to be about 30 minutes early. Yah, not so much. It took AN HOUR to get there because of the traffic. And worse – she knew it was an hour. When I mentioned it at the end of class, she just said, “yes, traffic can be bad”. Remember before when she agreed with me about the 30 minute commute limit? Yah. That asshole. It is probably also why she didn’t want me to meet her there for our first meeting. Because she knew that an hour was the actual travel time.
  2. More of her mom cooking, her 2 year old running around, and the smell of food everywhere.
  3. These students were some of the worst behaved students I have ever tried to teach, and I’ve had some real bad apples in my classes. Found out at the end that the very worst of them was the owner’s son.
  4. Partway through the second class, without looking up from her phone she says, “Yah, they’re bored because they know this already. You’ll have to do something else next class.” This was after she had pre-approved my lesson plans for the two weeks I’d been teaching, explaining that I was going to review because I had NO idea what they had learned. The lesson plans she had been sooooo happy with.
  5. As I left the apartment, there was the world’s largest cockroach trying to get on the elevator with me.

By the end of the second night, I had had enough. First, I told her that although her feedback was welcome, telling me that I wasn’t teaching what she wanted me to after approving my lesson plans and DURING THE LESSON was not appropriate. I also said that if she wanted me to teach something different for the next classes that it was fine, but she’d have to get over to me that night or the next morning (the next class was on Sunday) what she wanted so I could plan. She agreed.

Now, in while all this bullshit is happening, I also come down with the plague. Combination of grubby kids and stress. So I’m sick sick sick by Saturday. And guess what? By 5pm on the Saturday I still had no idea what she wanted the next day. So I texted her and quit. To be honest, I probably would have quit anyway. On Friday night I had nightmares – legit nightmares – about teaching in her apartment again.

I’ve never quit anything like that before, but I honestly couldn’t even imagine going back for one more minute. She seemed to be waiting for it though, as she didn’t seem too concerned that I wouldn’t be there the next morning. It may have helped that I said I didn’t even want the money she already owed me. She did ask if there was anything wrong with her school. HA! I promise I was very diplomatic and just responded, “That’s not my place to say.”

I haven’t heard from her since.

So. Finding work in Vietnam is easy. Finding decent work can be a lot trickier. Definitely be on the lookout for certain red flags:

  1. They don’t give a lot of detail (school name, location, etc) in the advert.
  2. They respond to EVERY teacher that posts looking for a job.
  3. They don’t care to meet you before you will teach.
  4. They want to meet you AND have you do a “demo” lesson that is a) longer than 20-30 minutes and b) not paid. (I had one person ask me to do a 3 hour “demo”. HA!)
  5. They don’t want to meet you where you will be teaching.*
  6. There isn’t a set plan in place for what the students have been learning.
  7. You can’t contact the current or previous teacher.
  8. If it is just covering for a few classes, there is no lesson plan or materials.

There are probably more signs, but this will do for a start. As well, note that some of these should be taken with a grain of salt, as there are different circumstances. Such as number 4 – my adult class met me in a coffee shop, as I was going to be teaching them in their offices and we couldn’t go in there during the day. It worked out fine. Just listen to your instincts.

As well, this doesn’t encompass the more legit, permanent places. They have processes in place and you should, at least, do a Skype interview (APAX), just an interview (Apollo), a very thorough and difficult interview (Schools Link), or an interview and demo (E-Connect). Your experience may even differ with these big companies.

Again, mostly listen to your instincts. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. And if even the cockroaches are trying to run away, you probably should as well.

Walking in the Rain

On Sunday Danny and I decided we would walk the couple of kilometers to the giant Lotte Center to check it out. It is the second tallest building in Hanoi, but we were mostly interested in the basement, where the Lotte Mart is. Not because we were already craving Korean goodies, mind you, but just to check out a) what cat food they had and b) if they had Command Strips.

They had both, but we are really watching our money, so we walked away without purchasing anything. We also didn’t check out the observation deck, but once we are both working regularly I think we will.

We left Lotte and walked to nearby Pawsome Pet Store. Our little fuzzies will be here soon, and we needed to source out where we could get some decent food and other cat necessities. We found Pawsome, looked around, made some notes, and decided we should probably check out more than one place.

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Our cats (Bug and Fatler), arriving soon.

As we walked out of the shop, it was started to spit a little rain. Now, both Dan and I know how much rain can come and how quickly it can come (you learn this fast in Hanoi), but we thought we’d take a risk as the next pet store wasn’t too far away.

It may not have been far, but we didn’t quite make it before it really started raining hard. So hard that we took shelter in a tiny hole-in-the-wall bánh mì place that invited us to come in. They didn’t expect us to order anything, so we did. Had a sausage-style bánh mì and a Coke each, and sat waiting for the rain to abate. It didn’t quite stop, but once it slowed enough that we thought it might, we headed on. We were only a few hundred meters to the next shop.

Rain (1).jpg

The next pet store was also alright – it had some things that the first didn’t and we noted a few more things down. We actually bought a cat brush there, and as we were trying to transact, all the power in the shop went out. Fortunately, it seemed isolated, for as we walked out of the store, the lights seemed to be on everywhere else.

Because of the continued rain, we figured our chances of getting a Grab taxi were going to be low and the fares high, so we walked on. We were only about 40 minutes walking from home, and the rain had really slowed. Besides, there was one more pet shop we wanted to check out along the way.

We never did go to that other shop. We weren’t even half-way home when the rain began in earnest. We huddled against a wedding dress shop under the woefully inadequate shelter of the awning and tried to wait out the rain.

Rain (2)

20% chance? LIES.

After waiting for about 10 minutes, I pushed Dan to start walking. He didn’t want to because of how heavily it was raining, but I couldn’t see it getting any lighter and we were only about 25 minutes from home at this point. He asked to wait another 10 minutes, which we did. During that time, I filmed a bit of the rain. I didn’t capture the amazing lightning strike and thunder that hit just as I stopped the video, nor did I get pictures of just how flooded the street got. There were motorbikes going by on which riders had their feet submersed in water.

That’s when we decided it wasn’t worth waiting – the rain wasn’t letting up and the street we were standing beside was quickly overflowing onto the sidewalks. As soon as we stepped out from under the awning, it was like stepping fully-clothed into a shower. Within seconds we were drenched through to the skin. Thank goodness I had the plastic bag from the pet shop – we put our phones and wallets in it and slogged on.

We made a left toward the lake, which had all but disappeared in the rain that was curtaining down. We followed the lake home, so wet that it wasn’t possible to get more wet. Thank goodness the rain was warm, and at least the weather meant that there wasn’t a lot of traffic to deal with.

Right before home, we had to go through an extremely flooded portion of Võng Thị Street, unavoidable as it was right where our lane meets Võng Thị. Normally, I wouldn’t mind walking through the rainwater, even though it was about knee-deep. Dan had different issues, as although I was in flip-flops, he was in shoes and socks, and definitely uninterested in walking them through this giant puddle, even though they were already soaked through.

I was a wee bit squeamish about the entire wading ordeal because that street is mostly a market most days – including butchers and other stalls. The flooded corner was usually where all the trash from the neighbourhood and market was piled. Had it been picked up before the rain or not? Was it around in that puddle somewhere? Had it rained long enough to wash away the fecal matter from the ducks, chickens, dogs, cats, geese, and flipping horse that we sometimes saw along that road? How about the blood and other offal from the animals that were slaughtered? Or was all that, along with the garbage, mixing together in this giant flood-puddle to make some sort of disease-riddled soup?

::SIDE NOTE::

No, really. A horse. Tied up beside the butcher’s table. Horse. I don’t even want to know.

::END SIDE NOTE::

With no other choice, we waded in. Taking small cautious steps as the road underneath in that part of the street is, understandably, none too smooth. We made it through with no stubbed toes or ankles twisted in potholes, and then it was two minutes to home.

Once inside, we went directly to the shower to take off our wet clothes. I was able to wring rainwater out of my underpants. We were extra careful when washing our feet and legs to ensure we got all the Võng Thị puddle soup off.

Even though it would have been misery to walk through if we had to be at work or some other place, it was kind of fun walking through rain so heavy that we could hardly see. I laughed a lot, and even Dan admitted later that it had been an interesting experience. Having said that, the next time it starts to rain, I’m calling a cab.

 

Ridin’ in the Rain

I’m sure I made it clear in my post about renting a bike in Hanoi that I do NOT have much experience on a motorbike. Yet here I am, bombing around a city with insane traffic.

In spite of the traffic, I really enjoy getting around on a motorbike. It is pretty freeing, especially when the main traffic laws you must follow are 1) not driving on the sidewalk (which people still do) and 2) not going the wrong way up a street (which people still do). Other than that (and not having a bazillion people on the bike… which people still do), there isn’t much to worry about. Even the traffic lights and signs seem to be more like suggestions than laws. So I don’t have to worry about breaking laws when I am riding.

I do have a zillion other things to worry about, though.

When I rented the bike, Danny (at the shop) laughed when I said that I’ve never been so spatially aware in my life since coming to Hanoi, even when walking. He laughed because he said the opposite is generally true of the Vietnamese. But so far I haven’t had my personal bike-space invaded too badly.

Although I thought I could handle my lightweight little automatic Yamaha, even in the traffic, I still worried at first about riding in the rain. Not just because of the danger of water on the road, but also because of the reduced visibility. But I was enjoying it, especially because when I got to go a little faster (30km… whoo!!) it felt like I was wearing a cape instead of a flowery unflattering rain poncho. BATGIRL ON A BIKE. So I was enjoying it.

UNTIL TODAY.

There is rain, and then there is RAIN. You know how people say, “God is in the rain”? Well, I’m here to tell you that if that is true, God freaking loves Hanoi. A lot. Especially today.

I woke up and it was POURING rain. Buckets and buckets of rain. And I could hear thunder. Unfortunately I had a meeting at 8am, so I was going to have to go out in it. I put on all my kit and started out.

Despite the raincoat, I was already getting damp just trying to wheel the bike out of our door yard. I got it out, locked the gate, and jumped on the bike. Which then would not start. And then it did, but as soon as I gave it some gas, it would stall.

Remember I know nothing about bikes. But I tried a few more times and it finally decided to catch and go. I rode down our wee lane to the main street… which was completely flooded. I mean, when I put my foot down to navigate the corner slowly, my foot and leg disappeared to more than halfway up my calf. That was the worst flooding I came across, but there were huge, scary puddles everywhere.

My visibility was poor. My eyes were full of rain (as was my mouth half the time). There was a good litre of water pooled in between my arms on the raincoat. Water was coming up from underneath somewhere and I was soaked through.

And then the lightning and thunder caught up to me.

That was pretty terrifying, actually. The thunder would sound simultaneously with the lightning flashes overhead. It was so loud that I could barely hear all the honking horns that are perpetually sounding in Hanoi.

In the end, I made it to my appointment, just two minutes late. I was the first there though, so I suppose everyone had a struggle with the rain today. Hopefully the next ride will be a lot drier.

PS: I am adding a “rain” tag to my WordPress tags. I have a feeling it’s going to come up a lot over the next few months in Vietnam!

Grab a Bike, Rent a Bike

The easiest way to get around Hanoi is by far on a motorcycle. Note I didn’t say “safest”, just “easiest”. I haven’t taken any pictures or videos of the traffic here, because there are a million pictures and videos online (seriously, just Google “Hanoi traffic”), but you can take my word on it: The traffic here is mental. Regardless, being on a bike is usually the easiest and quickest way to get from A to B.

For my first couple of weeks, if I was going somewhere, I was on the back of a Grab Bike. Grab, like Uber, is a taxi service made up of a lot of drivers. Anyone can apply to be a driver, and I’m not too sure what the hire criteria is. But there are a lot of drivers. I started using Grab instead of Uber (or Lyft) mostly on a whim, and whilst I was using a service like this, I was using Grab.

At the beginning, I was highly impressed and loved the service. I would use the app to say where I was and where I was going. The app would tell me the fare (no surprises, no haggling) and how long it would be until my driver was with me. Once I was dropped at the other end, I could pay in cash and rate the driver. Happy days! It seemed like a great service.

Until it wasn’t.

Too many times over the past week I have given myself an hour to get to a location just thirty minutes away and been nearly late. Not because of traffic, because of idiotic drivers. On more than one occasion I have had drivers (sometimes twice in a row) cancel on me after I had already waiting more than five to ten minutes for a driver supposedly only two minutes away. Worse, some of them refuse to cancel (there must be a penalty on them if they cancel too often), forcing me to cancel which bumps me down the priority list. GAH. One day this week their shenanigans meant I waited 40 minutes for a taxi to take me home… less than 15 minutes away. I was getting super frustrated and often sent rant-texts to Dan. Keep in mind that I was waiting either in the blistering heat (41c on day) or the pouring rain. Either way, not happy.

So, see you later (until I’m out drinking) Grab! I decided to speed up my plans to rent my own bike. Now this was an easy process.

Rent-A-Bike had come highly recommended to me, so I decided to check them out. I sent an inquiry telling them about me (especially my lack of experience on a bike!) and asking for recommendations. Thu got back to me in under an hour and had two bikes that she thought would work for me (a Honda Cub or a Yamaha Mio) and said I could pop by to try them out.

Two days later, I was in their shop. And just to underline that I was doing the right thing, the Grab driver that took me there 1) drove right past where I was standing to be picked up, and pissed around the block behind me for a good five minutes while I waited in the rain, 2) said he knew where he was going but stopped to ask directions five times – ignoring the map on his phone and mine, 3) stopped by the side of a random road and told me to get off the bike… to get his raincoat, 4) didn’t bother checking the address once we were close but rather just kept pointing at buildings until I finally had him stop in front of the right building, and 5) didn’t have any change, at all, and made me ask Thu for change. YARG.

Thu, Danny, and (I believe Chris?) were all in the shop when I arrived. At first, Danny said I should probably talk to one of the others, but when I said how much of a noob I was, he got up to help me. And help me he did!

We talked about which bikes would be best for me, dependent on my skill, usage, and budget. I was well-pleased that he kept my finances in mind because money is tight tight tight at the moment.

He thought it would be best if I started with the Yamaha Mio, an automatic bike that was in my budget. It isn’t really built to carry two people, but as I doubt Dan will be comfortable riding with me for awhile, I wasn’t too worried.

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My Mio!

Knowing that I was new, Danny (from the shop, not my husband – this might be confusing!) took me down to a quieter road. He talked me through all the controls. We went for a short drive while he explained how to drive. And then it was my turn.

I sat in front and him behind me. He had me start the bike but then he reached around me and took the handles. He got us moving and told me to take over. This was awesome, as I was most nervous about starting out. His way meant I could get a feel for the acceleration without spinning out from a dead stop. He was very calm and talked me through turning and how to deal with cars driving straight at me in my part of the street (that actually happened). I was feeling confident and comfortable after our lesson so we went back to the shop.

Danny then offered to have me try the Cub and any other bike I was considering, but I was honest and said I thought the Mio, being an automatic, was probably the best one for me. The Cub is a semi-automatic, but until I really get used to the traffic and riding in Hanoi, I think it is better if I have less to think about! Even though I declined trying the other bikes, I was told I was welcome to come back any time and give them a try, or to switch up the bike if I was so inclined.

We wrote up the paperwork, and although it made a mighty dint in my rapidly dwindling funds, I can’t say it wasn’t fair. To rent the bike is $55us a month, with one month’s deposit, if you rent for two or more months. So, two months plus a deposit. Additionally, Rent-a-Bike offers something that is nonexistent in Vietnam – insurance on the bike. For the cost of a month’s rent, I get a year’s coverage for loss, theft, and write-off. Instead of paying the cost to replace the entire bike (yikes), I only have to pay 30%. Hopefully I’ll never need it, but isn’t that what one always says about insurance?

Fees paid, I also purchased a phone holder (so I can get directions) which they installed. Thu went over the controls again and showed me how to lock the bike as well as where to fill the tank. I was given a printout about parking, police, and other exciting (read: scary) things about riding a bike in Vietnam as well as a rain poncho (having just bought one, I’m using their poncho as a spare/bike cover).

Overall, it was a great experience and I felt like they were really attentive. I also feel assured that should anything happen, they will be there for me whether I need information or assistance. If you are looking to rent in Vietnam, definitely check out Rent-a-Bike!

Raincoat on, borrowed helmet on, I walked the bike into position, hopped on, and rode home. Tonight I will be really riding out in it (my work tonight takes me into the very busy Old Quarter part of Hanoi) and I can’t say I’m not both nervous and excited. Adventure!

motocape.JPG

Apartment Hunting

I am afraid my post on apartment hunting in Hanoi isn’t going to be dreadfully informative. Perhaps more illustrative of just how damned easy it can be to find decent housing in this city.

Like when job hunting, Facebook groups are the place to be when looking for new digs. But not always in the groups you would think. There are a handful of groups dedicated to housing, but posts for apartments and houseshares crop up all over the various groups dedicated to Hanoi.

Long before we moved to Vietnam, Dan and I had been watching the groups and various posts about apartments. We had a good idea of where we wanted to be, what we wanted to spend, and what we thought that much money should get us.

In Hanoi, foreigners tend to gather in just a few districts, with Tây Hồ and Ba Đình having the highest concentration of them. You can imagine then that an area like Tây Hồ also has the highest concentration of westernised shops and facilities. It also means that rents are often a little higher in these areas, but then again, the housing is also a little more modern.

Dan and I decided that we would focus mostly on Tây Hồ, not because we love other foreigners, but because we thought it would be nice to have a newer place and liked the idea of being close to the lake, even if it isn’t the kind of lake you would want to swim in (although I have seen some brave, brave souls swimming and fishing in it).

Our next consideration was price. We settled on an amount of $500(usd) a month. Which buys more than you would think in Hanoi. What you get for that amount varies, from bachelor-style places to two-bedroom flats, from everything included (except electricity, which is rarely if ever included) to little included, from fully kitted to sparsely furnished.

For our $500, we wanted at least one bedroom, everything included (except electricity, but a cleaner needed to be part of the deal), a balcony, and a washing machine in the apartment. Other than that, we were pretty open. So I began the search.

The first thing I did was post in a group on Facebook which is just for women in Hanoi.

::SIDE NOTE::

I also had joined a ‘ladies only’ group in Seoul, and let me tell you, that group and the one for Hanoi are by far the most supportive and helpful groups on Facebook.

::END SIDE NOTE::

I asked the group if they had the contact details of an agent that they’d used and trusted, so I wasn’t just going with randos that were posting apartments on Facebook. The group responded with a good handful of names and numbers, and a couple of people even sent private messages. One of these girls asked where I was looking and my budget. When I told her, she said there was a flat going in her building for that price, would I be interested. She said the building was all foreigners, and the landlord was a great guy. I said I was interested.

Long story short, Dan and I came and looked at the apartment. It was everything we wanted so we gave Dave – the Irish landlord who owns the building along with his wife – a mini hold-deposit (he said $100 would do, we had $65 on us, he accepted it) and asked when we could move in. That was a Monday. We moved in on the Saturday.

We are very happy with the flat, and still surprised at how painless it was to find a place with everything we wanted for a good price. We are even pleased that we are on the quiet side of the lake (more to the north west, the action is more around the east) and it isn’t too noisy down our little alley.


I suppose if I was to give any advice it would be this – reach out to people that are already here. Have an idea before hand your budget and what you expect and want for that money. It is possible to negotiate down a price here as well, and you’ll probably get a better deal (like in so many places in the world) if you deal directly through the landlord and not through an agent.

One last thing – prepare to pay a month’s deposit and at least one month’s rent (some places ask for two or three months in advance). Although we wouldn’t have agreed to three months in advance, there were lots of ads requesting it. Just a head’s up.

Something to Blog About

It is unreal to me that it has been more than a year since I’ve last added a post to the ‘Tales. Unreal, and a little sad.

There was a time when I was a regular blogger, and I think the writing was good for me. There are a lot of reasons why I haven’t been blogging, even though there has been loads happening.

  1. After the Immigration Debacle of 2013, I felt like most of the people who were coming to my blog were only interested in reading about that nonsense, and for me that chapter is closed.
  2. I started blogging as a way to keep family and friends updated about what was going on in my life when I first moved to Korea in 2005, but with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and a million other places to keep folks in the loop, blogging started to fall away as seemingly archaic and a bit much when my snippets and stories were so readily available in other, more convenient places.
  3. Blogs these days seem to be more about specialisation, not about personal spaces in which to just write and share thoughts about whatevers. Maybe that’s not true, and I’m out of the “blog loop” (probably not a thing), but it feels true. People are experts in things and they write about those things. I’m an expert in nothing, without anything really to add to what scores of others are already saying.
  4. I’m lazy.

That last reason is the biggest problem. I’m lazy and writing is work, even if I enjoy doing it. Still work. And I’m definitely work-adverse.

But recently, the husband (yah, got married since I blogged last year… this is what I mean. Shit is still happening in life – new job, new city, two new cats, new husband – but I just don’t bother writing it up) and I have started seriously talking about “what next”. What we are going to do after Korea and how to go about doing it.

We think we know the when and the where – a move to Hanoi, Vietnam in late 2017 or spring 2018 – and now we are going through the steps of figuring out here to there. And I think that could be a cool process to blog bits about. Someone might find it useful, but more importantly, I may think it is cool to look back and use the blog as a memory aid.

Part of what triggered the idea to write about all this was looking back through my pictures of my trip through Vietnam in 2007. I was lazy then and didn’t label any of the pictures – not even to differentiate between Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi. I can look some of the places up now and try to piece it all together… but I wish I had been smart enough and motivated enough to just put a blurb on them in the first place. It may have really helped me attach more concrete memories to that trip.

I promise nothing. But I’m seriously thinking it may be time to fire up the old brain again and get writing.