Finding My Place (part 1)

I realise that it has been a very long time since I’ve last blogged. Tonnes has happened since then, mostly good. We still love Vietnam and are happy we made the jump to come here from Korea. Honestly, I wish we had come sooner. Much as I love Korea, I’ve been enjoying Vietnam a lot more.

Since my last epic rant about finding work, work has mostly been found. It didn’t work out quite as expected… but then again, when does it?

Both Dan and I bailed on the “real” job that we had been waiting on to start. Dan was smarter than I – he bailed much sooner when he realised that my minimal hours and his occasional cover class was not going to pay the bills, so to speak. So he told the “real” job that he wasn’t going to work with them and moved over to an academy, where he is (for the most part) happy with what he is doing.

::SIDE NOTE::

By “real” job I mean a company with an office, a contract, an offer to get your visa and stuff sorted. A salaried job. In our case, it was a company that placed teachers into the public school system. There are a few that do that. I’m not naming the company as I’m sure others have no problem with them. If you are super curious, get in touch and I’m happy enough to name and shame. Just not publicly.

::END SIDE NOTE::

I bailed on them at the 11th hour – their fault, not mine. By that time I had reviewed six versions of the contract (signing the sixth) and on the Friday afternoon before we were meant to start, they handed me a seventh.

I couldn’t believe it, and said as much. Keep in mind a couple of things:

  1. The previous contract revisions had been mostly to help them, not just to help me. They weren’t negotiations as I never asked for more than what they had originally offered. It was to clarify wording and to protect myself in a couple of the clauses. All the revisions had been mutually reviewed and approved by both sides.
  2. They were really cagey about the start date. They weren’t sure if it was going to be the beginning of September, making the start date for training two weeks prior… or the beginning of August, meaning we would have to be ready to come in for mid-July.
  3. “Two weeks training”, as verbally confirmed and as stated TWICE in the contract, became ONE AFTERNOON to get the books. I didn’t even know where the school was except on a Google Map, or where the photocopier was, or who the TAs were, or the lady who was supposed to be our support, or even what the effing office hours were so I’d know when to prep. Literally “two weeks” became “two hours”, and when I asked about what had happened to the two weeks, the main HR contact said, “You must have been mistaken.” Um, no. It is in the contract, you fucking moron. Twice.

First – why the start date was a problem. Because they wouldn’t give us a straight answer, it meant we couldn’t give others a straight answer about our availability. It made it hard to take on any summer camp classes or anything because we didn’t know when we would have to run off for this elusive training period. This is when Dan finally bailed and just took on a full time job at an English academy.

Where I finally gave up was the contract. When we were told that we would be given new contracts to sign, I thought they had to be kidding. But Junior HR assured me it was for good reason… we were getting more money. They were doing away with a higher overtime rate and just making the base rate the overtime rate. Which meant a slightly higher salary. Well, right on. That’s the kind of change that I can handle. So, even though I was already extremely dubious about the lack of organisation and training, I figured I’d been through worse in Korea and I’d try my luck.

I waited until the Sunday to review the contract. I. Was. FURIOUS.

First, the idiots didn’t change the salary. So I would have had to ask for another contract anyway. The very reason that they gave us new contracts (or so they said) and they didn’t even check that they had changed it.

More importantly, those sneaky little douchebags had gone through the rest of the contract and made other changes without mentioning it. I’m fairly certain they were hoping no one would notice.

::SIDE NOTE::

Most people probably didn’t. I have a feeling I was one of the first foreign teachers they’ve ever dealt with in the five years they’ve been operating that has even read the damned contract. READ YOUR CONTRACT, PEOPLE.

::END SIDE NOTE::

It wasn’t even that they had pulled up an old file accidentally, either. A lot of the changes that we had gone through were definitely there. Nooooo, they had gone through and made some changes that impacted the teachers, and not in a nice way.

  1. Instead of paying the exchange on the bank rate on the day of pay, they were going to pay a flat $1 = 22,000 dong rate. Seeing as how that day it was 22,900 (and projected to rise), that was a potential loss of over $1000 a year for teachers.
  2. In the original contract, they said that you needed a note if you took more than the one sick day a term that you were allowed. In this new one, they made it much clearer that you weren’t getting paid for that day. Another potential loss of money for teachers.
  3. I specifically asked that they add “in Hanoi” to the clause that said the company could send you to a different center if they needed you to. I wasn’t going to agree to that and end up out of the city. It had been scrubbed again in the new contract.

I could go on, but you get the picture. I was pissed right off because it was so sly of them. No mention of any change but to the salary, which they forgot to update.

I went in to discuss it on the Monday (meant to start Tuesday). They were willing to change a lot of it back, but just for me. Not for all the teachers. Like it was just a negotiation. I still turned them down because they couldn’t assure the following:

  1. That I wouldn’t have to argue with the accountant every month that my pay was meant to be calculated differently.
  2. That the director or whichever idiot changed this contract wouldn’t just up and change the contract again in three months.
  3. That I was really really enrolled in the national health insurance program, and not just being charged a random amount and being told that’s what it was for.

With all these issues already happening, I couldn’t trust them to be supportive and not dicks throughout the school year, so I bailed. Junior HR was very understanding; she knew that what the company was doing was not right.

Once again, I should have trusted my instincts much earlier on, but I was so interested in teaching gifted students (I was being given top classes) at a high school level that I let it cloud my judgement.

Next time, if a contract states (even from a “real” job company) that a. I’m being paid in cash at an arbitrary exchange rate, b. I’m being charged $50 tax instead of a percentage of my earnings, and/or c. I’m being charged $10 a month for health insurance instead of a percentage of my earnings, I’m going to run away, right away.

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