Interviews, Demos, and Offers (Oh my!)

I promised in the job hunting post that I would talk a little more about the interview process, demo classes, and offer experience here in Hanoi. So here we go!

Interview Process

I would say that at least 75% of the times I sent out my CV I was contacted for next steps in the process. There is definitely a need in Hanoi for teachers who are qualified (this means you have a Bachelor in something, a TEFL Certificate or better, a clean police record, and ideally some experience) so the response rate on my applications was quite good.

I’ve only done a handful of interviews, and they have been interestingly different.

The first interview was with an individual who had found my CV on vietnamworks.com and wanted a private teacher to run classes for his team at work to help them improve their business English. We met at a coffee shop and had a chat. Arranged the class days and times, as well as pay. Talked about what they wanted to learn. That was it. Job sorted.

The second was with an agent. I didn’t realise it was an agent when I sent my details – it was a reply to a person posting on Facebook with a gmail account. When I realised they were an agent, I thought about backing out (you apparently do not want to go through an agency / recruiter here) but thought it would be a good idea to practice interviewing. There wasn’t really much of an “interview”. I filled out a form, gave a brief spiel about myself, and then we went on to the demo lesson (more on that below). After the demo she said that there was no way they could pay me enough. Upon asking about the hours and calculating the pay per hour for the job, she was right. So I left.

Next was a Skype “interview”. I use the term very loosely here. The guy asked me one question (“tell me about yourself”) and then the rest of the time told me what I could expect during the training week and what I would need to do to prepare for the visa process. It wasn’t an interview, it was an offer. It felt like they were just throwing teachers against a wall and seeing who stuck. Although the money and hours would have been alright, I felt as though I would go mad with boredom teaching their program (it was highly, highly structured), so I declined that job.

After that I met another individual who is in the process of building her school. It was more like a traditional interview, but it felt like we were already working together before even 15 minutes had passed. She asked about my availability almost right off the bat and was trying to work in a schedule, so I felt like I had the job before we even really started. I have accepted working with her as our teaching philosophies are well-matched. Right now I’m only scheduled for one writing class every Saturday with her students, but she’s trying to arrange more classes that fit with my schedule.

Another in-person interview with a bigger company that was a little more interview-like again. There were some interview questions, but often I felt more like I was interviewing them, and not the other way around. Afterwards I was invited to do a demo class (more on that below) after which there was more discussion about what my role there would be like. It is the company that I am currently in process of signing the contract with, as I’m very interested in the role that they are offering. More on that once it comes to fruition – I don’t want to jinx anything!

The last interview that I did was by far the most professional, robust, and difficult. It had more typical and expected questions (including the stupidest interview question in the world – “tell me your strengths and weaknesses”) in addition to some pretty tough questions about what you have done or would do in class. They were only tough because if you haven’t done your TEFL course, you would have NO idea how to answer as the answers were highly dependent on the TEFL lesson planning format. Such as describing your lesson using the TEFL lesson planning stages. I must have done well with the interview as I was offered a position (which I’ve had to decline as I’ve decided to take the other role). I thought it was strange that they didn’t ask for a demo lesson after how robust the interview was, but they didn’t.

So, as you can see, there is quite a difference in what you can expect in a job interview here. Seriously from “you’ve got the job, this is a formality” to some fairly tough questions in an interview lasting almost two hours.

The Dreaded Demo

I think demo lessons is what I was fearing most. Especially since I have never taught in Vietnam before. Would my style and experience from Korea fit? What kind of lessons would they be looking for?

First thing to know about demos – they are typically under 30 minutes. It is rare you will be asked to do more than that, unless it is with a very prestigious and well-established company. If a private individual asks you to do a three hour demo lesson (as one did with me, saying it was “usual”… um, no it isn’t) you should either a) insist on being paid or b) run away. Three hours (or even one) isn’t a demo. That’s a lesson. And you should be paid.

My first demo was with the agency interview that I mentioned above. I wasn’t expecting it, they didn’t mention a demo until after we had our brief interview. I thought about declining it (wasn’t very keen on working with the agency anyway) since I had been given no notice of a demo, but thought it would be good practice before I went on to other things. She gave me four flashcards (doctor, nurse, driver, singer) and told me to demo a 10 minute lesson on those cards. The “students” would be three years old with some basic English skills. I could have some time to think about how to do the lesson.

I thought about what I was going to do and made a quick plan. I ended up only demoing for the one interviewer. I simply ran through how I would teach those four vocabulary words – having loads of kinder experience it wasn’t too hard. She loved it. Immediately after she said that there was no way they could pay me enough and that was that.

The other demo was a 30 minute lesson. I was emailed a few pages of a textbook and told to choose one section to give my lesson on to high school students. I had a couple days to prepare. When I went in, there were five employees as “students”. I ran through the lesson I had prepared and they were very happy with it. This is with the company I am accepting the role with.

There really isn’t much I can say about doing the demos. If you are given the time, definitely prepare and write down your plan. Sure, you might be able to “wing it”, but having an outline will keep you right and definitely make you more impressive. The only other advice I would give is this: Treat the interviewers like you would students. At one point in my second demo, two of them were talking to each other after our pair work as I was trying to speak and move the class along. I spoke to them just like I would students to get them back on task. I think that may have impressed them more than anything else I did!

The Offers

What I’m finding most amazing about the whole process is how so many “interviews” are actually job offers. I’m getting the sense that really solid, qualified candidates are a rarity in Hanoi. There are a LOT of people here looking for work, but they aren’t always the people companies are looking for. So often if you are good on paper and then show up and aren’t a complete mental, you’ve most likely got the job.

For privates, you will probably agree there and then what the lessons and pay will be, so that generally is the offer. For the bigger legit companies, you’ll be emailed an offer with a contract to sign. I would highly recommend reading those contracts carefully.

In general, this has been my experience in Hanoi. It has been easy enough finding work, now the trick will be making work, well, work. The big company I’ve accepted probably won’t start being a paying job until August or September, as they place teachers with the public schools. The two small jobs I have are small. I need to fill up the rest of my schedule, but I am in limbo waiting on the big company and one of the privates to see what the schedule will be. I’m going to try to get it sorted by the end of this week so I can start bringing in the money. But more on that in another post!

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One response to “Interviews, Demos, and Offers (Oh my!)

  1. Pingback: Finding work. Good work. | Turbotastical Tales

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