Monthly Archives: September 2013

Eleventh Hour Fun with the UKBA

Every time I think that this nightmare with the UKBA must be over, something else happens.

As you might know if you read this blog, it’s been about six weeks since I told the courts I wouldn’t be fighting the UKBA’s decision any longer. They told me they would tell the UKBA. After a few weeks  of hearing nothing from the UKBA, I contacted them to formally request my documents back because, at this point, I’m anxious to get moving and get on with things. This past year has been no way to live.

This “request” was yet another faceless, voiceless form to fill in; the UKBA is nothing if not consistent in avoiding all contact with the plebs. Oh, and also that it could take up to another 20 working days to get my documentation back and to not contact them until 20 days had passed.

Friday was 20 days.

So what do you do when 20 days goes by? It’s the UKBA, kids. So of course you have to fill out another fucking form. It would be funny if it wasn’t so ridiculous.

I don’t know if sending the second form triggered this or if it was just a coincidence… but someone from the UKBA called me today. They did not have good news. I am not a happy person at the moment.

You might know or remember that I had planned on going straight to Korea from the UK. Well, the UKBA has managed to fuck up all of that as well.

What I Learned Today that is
Making me Unhappy/Blind Raging Mad

  1. It is going to be another 5 – 14 working days until something called “Becket House” has my passport.
  2. They will email me when they have it so I can book a last-minute flight to Canada.
  3. I’m not allowed to fly anywhere else.
  4. I won’t actually be given my passport until I’m at the airport.
  5. This is the first time I’ve heard about any of this.

This means that I can’t get my Korean visa before I leave the UK. It means I have to pay the price of a last minute ticket to Vancouver. If I book 8 months in advance that’s a £700+ flight. I’m terrified what this is going to cost. In what was already a horrible, stressful process, now I have an extra 10 hour flight and huge cost to deal with. Never mind what I’m going to do with my extra stuff or what I’m going to do with myself in BC once I’m there and trying to sort out my Korean visa. All without an income, because I can’t work here and I won’t be able to work in Canada as (with any luck) I’ll only be there a few weeks.

What the living fuck, UK? Can anyone explain to me why I can’t get my passport before I have to leave so I can make my travel arrangements? Can anyone explain why the UK has the right to tell me where I go as long as I go? And don’t say “policy”. If one more person says “policy” to me today I’ll lose my fucking mind.

Not only am I furious about the (continuous) lack of information, the additional stress and hassle this will cause and the considerable amount of money (I don’t have) that this is going to cost; they’ve also stolen any joy I might have had in going home and seeing my friends and family there. I won’t ever forgive them for that.

For a year now this has been a never-ending cluster-fuck. I should have known that it wouldn’t end any better than it all started. If anyone needs me, I’ll be in the pub.

Living Situation Update

One of the effects of not knowing how long you’ll be in the country is not knowing how long you should keep your flat.

So last month I gave my notice on my flat on Brick Lane. I was here just over a year and although the flat had some issues (not the best landlords) I really loved living here. Brick Lane might have been noisy, but it was vibrant and central and interesting.

I wasn’t sure what I was going to do once I was past my move-out date (which is this Friday) because I didn’t know (and still don’t know) how long I would be here. 

Happily, my lovely friends Rich and Nell offered their spare room for the weekend, which was the first worry covered. It means so much that my first few nights homeless will be in the home of the loveliest couple in London.

I wasn’t too sure what I was going to do past this weekend though. I have a weekend to spend in Brighton with the fabulous Craig and Kevin, and couch offers from Kristi and Eva… but I have been growing increasingly concerned that I’ll be here long enough still that I could become a bother. Not having my passport or knowing when I’ll get it back is such a joy.

So, with great relief, I’ve found a room to sublet in Hackney for just under a month. The timing is perfect; they were looking for someone to take the room starting the day after I’m done at Rich and Nell’s place and until just about mid-October. 

Total strangers. But the place was tidy and there was lots of art on the walls. It had a homey feel and even though there are usually three boys living there, it didn’t smell like boy. And they have a super friend cat that I’m going to squish for a month.

Hopefully it will all work out. I’ve had issues with flatmates in East London before: I haven’t seen the Denizens of Aurghville for years now but I’m still emotionally scarred. If nothing else, I’ll end up with more stories and loads of kitty pictures for Instagram.

Not My Day in Court

In another universe, yesterday would have been the day I’d be in court to fight the decision handed to me by the UKBA back in March. And with how often I get asked “So how are you doing with everything anyway” these days, I thought I’d give a quick update on how I’m feeling about things and stuffs now that the court day has come and gone.

I still feel like I made the right decision to not pursue the hearing. Although logically the “punishment” (deportation and a 12 month re-entry ban) seems to severely outweigh the “crime” (missed a tickmark) in this situation, I still believe that a judge would have been hesitant to set precedence in this case by overturning the decision of the UKBA. So had I been in court yesterday, I honestly believe today I would have been out a hefty lawyer’s fee and just getting the gears in motion to move on.

I do wish I had more information from the UKBA earlier (like back in December, when the first application was returned would have been nice). If they had sent me back everything in March I wouldn’t have ever filed for the hearing and could have gotten moving earlier. That would have meant avoiding spending the last six months as I have done: Waiting in limbo for my life to change.

I’m not happy about having to leave my friends behind. In the past six years living so far from home many in London have become like family to me. I’m grateful that keeping in touch is easier than ever, but a Skype call is not the same as a pint down at pub. I’m going to miss a lot of people an awful lot.

My career in the London tech scene, which was just progressing nicely from operations to project and product management, also gets put on hold. At best gets put on hold. With 12 months out of the country, it could very well be the end of that progression. A year is a long time in technology and if I want to return, I may have to start at the beginning again. And I’m starting to feel a bit too old for that nonsense.

And leaving London stinks. I love this silly old city so much and I feel like although I’ve been so fortunate to have explored so much of it, I’ve definitely not seen enough. I could live a thousand years I think and not see enough of it.

But on to happier thoughts. There are some positives on the other side of all this bureaucratic governmental idiocy.

I am very excited about teaching again. I really enjoyed my time as a teacher before and looking forward to working with the kids again. I’ve actually had a student from when I was there previously get in touch and it’s made me realise how much I missed working with the little monsters.

I’m happy to be heading back to Asia. South Korea is an amazing country and I highly recommend checking it out. Of course, from there it is also easy and affordable to visit other countries in Southeast Asia… something else I’m really looking forward to. With any luck, this Christmas you’ll find me on a Malaysian island beach instead of sitting about in my pants in a cold London flat, eating leftover pizza and playing Civilisation.

So how am I feeling?  

I’m alright. I have a lot to do in the next few weeks – like move out of my flat this week, hassle the UKBA for my passport (oh yah, those dirty birds still have it), find a teaching job in Korea and finish my Korean paperwork for my Korean visa. And do all that without a job or a home.

It’s a scary time. But it is also an exciting time. At least you shouldn’t hear me complain about being bored for the next few weeks.